Top wedding invitations fails and how to avoid them

Wedding Invitations | August 13 2014 | by Chris | 0 Comments

In the past years, as I got closer to the third decade of my life, more and more of my friends decided to finally tie the knot. It came natural that, with the continuosly rising collection of wedding invitations, I started a mental list of all the things I disliked about them and swear they’ll never happen on my watch (at my future imaginary wedding with my imaginary boyfriend, nothing planned yet, roger that Mom?). These are some of the biggest fails and a few tips on how to avoid them:

1. Spelling mistakes

I’ve always wondered how could anyone forget to proofread something as important as the announcement of one of the most important days in their life. Nobody can tell you which flowers, cupcakes or first dance songs are the best choice for a wedding, but, when it comes to spelling, there shouldn’t be any doubts: what’s right is right.

However, I’ve seen it happening so many times and, in their defense, I’ll just suppose they were too tired and must have been reading and writing and reading again and editing and cutting those words for hundreds of times.

So don’t rush into printing the invitations and send them to a fresh pair of eyes for revising. You surely have at least one “grammar nazi” friend. And there are plenty of online brides communities and Facebook groups where you can post the invitation and ask for help (you can even send it to us, we’ll be glad to offer our support 🙂 ).

The sweet spot card wedding invitation

[photo credit: SweetSpotCards.com]

2. Ugly aspect

You have to navigate (or, better said, Pinterest search) through mountains of horrible invitation models until you are able to find a decent, elegant one. It’s beyond my understanding why those kitschy glittering invitations are so expensive, but it is what it is.

Make sure you start searching as early as possible for some decent elegant invitations, that won’t cost a fortune and represent you. And just to be clear, by “you” I mean “the couple that is getting married”, not the family or friends.

P.S. the save the date cards should match the invitations.

Hollywood movie themed wedding invitation

[photo credit: ThePenilessBride.wordpress.com]

3. Bad wording

I probably should have started with this instead of the spelling: keep the text clear and simple. Who? + what? + when? + where? + call to action (“please RSVP here: … before: …“). Drop the quotes found on Tumblr or any other copy-pastes from the internet, no old-fashion talk (unless you’re royal. are you royal?), no cheesy poems (unless you’re poets or artists and you wrote them personally). With the risk of repeating myself, the wedding invitation should represent you and nobody else.

Modern Luxe wedding invitation

[photo credit: JustInviteMe.com]

4. Receiving them very late (especially when it’s a destination wedding)

It’s bad manners. The guests will probably think you forgot about them or, even worse, be offended by thinking they were backups from your B-list.

Start working on the invitations as early as possible and take a margin of error, for the unexpected issues.

Also, don’t place the order until you hold in your hands the final invitation and envelope, that won’t need any more adjustments (aka “imprimatur”). That means no approving on a digital invitation, only printed, paper, ok?

Nautical wedding invitation

[photo credit: Abbey and Izzie designs]

5. Few other details to keep in mind

– I’ve been a vegetarian for 5 years and most people I know have some kind of allergy or intolerance, so it would only be appropriate to add a food preferences box on the reply card.

– Regarding the wedding registry / gift information: I’ve read many opinions on this subject and, basically, the conclusion was that it’s not appropriate to put it on the invitation. Tell it to your closest friends and family, those interested will surely know to ask them.

– Another delicate topic: if you won’t allow kids to the wedding, then simply don’t list them on the envelope. If you do, include their names. Avoid writing “no children“, “adults only” or “adult reception“. Extra useful reading on the kids subject.

– And read this on how to properly address the invitations.

Red White Blue wedding invitation

[photo credit: OhSoBeautifulPaper.com]

Other links for inspiration:
36 Cute And Clever Ways To Save The Date
16 Alternative Wedding Invitations And Save The Dates
Thoroughly Contemporary Wedding Invitations
Italian Seaside Wedding Inspiration
Elegant + Timeless Letterpress Wedding Invitation
12 unique wedding invitations for the design-obsessed bride and groom
Seven Swans Wedding Stationery

What do YOU consider to be the biggest wedding invitation fails? And which are your favorite wedding invitations you’ve seen so far? Feel free to post links to your Pinterest boards 🙂 you can also follow ours HERE.

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